Deakin University

 

Tess Brady


An exegesis concerning the novel
Fragments of a Map

 

Provenance: This exegesis and its accompanying novel were submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Faculty of Arts, Deakin University, in April 1998.


Table of Contents

Abstract

Summary

Introduction

Section 1 - Thematic Concerns - A Feminist Position

  • Overview
  • The lens - sadness
  • Major influences: Gilman and Greyer-Ryan
  • Domestic silencing
  • Removal of women's knowledge

Section 2 - The Writing Process

  • History - fiction and myth
  • A chronicle of a quest?
  • The first draft
  • The problem of duality
  • The mandalas
  • Fear of completion
  • Weaving the fabric of the novel
  • On completion

Section 3 - Research and the Vinland Map

  • Types of research for the novelist
  • The character's knowledge
  • The novelist and the bowerbird
  • The academic and creative become each other
  • The Translator
  • Language
  • The novelist protects herself
  • Bibliography

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    Abstract

    Fragments of a Map explores the journey towards completion for two women.

    Their journey is mirrored in the narrative by the women's attempt to unravel the provenance of the Vinland Map. Central to the narrative is the question: "Is the Vinland Map a valuable 15th century map or a clever forgery?"

    The novel, through its concerns and structure, plays with the notion of research in the creative arts.

    This exegesis comments upon the concerns of the novel, and the writing and research processes.

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    Summary

    Tess Brady, known officially as Mariwyn Nelson Brady submits her novel, Fragments of a Map, and the exegesis, An exegesis concerning the novel, Fragments of a Map, as fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. She has been assisted in this process by her supervisors Ms Judith Rodriguez of Deakin University and Dr Nigel Krauth of Griffith University.

    The novel, Fragments of a Map explores the journey towards completeness of the main character Meridian, and her friend Crete. As a metaphor of, and a commentary on this journey, the narrative concerns itself with Meridian's efforts to discover the provenance of a 15th century map whose authenticity is held in considerable doubt.

    The exegesis traces the development of the thematic concerns of this novel. It also focuses on the writing process employed and on one of the relationships between creativity and research.

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    October 2010

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